Eugene Fisher October 17, 2018

I’ve always had a fascination with games and gameplay. Growing up I played lots of video games, board games, and playground games with family and friends. As an adult, I have large board game and video game collections, and I love to pass on my love of games by playing these with my wonderful nieces. For Christmas five years ago I wanted to give a unique present to these girls and their families so I created a card game based off of one of their favorite video games, Mario Kart. They really enjoyed playing it over the years, so now, in the spirit of the holidays, I want to offer this gift to all of you.

As you can probably tell by looking, this game is adapted from the classic card games, Crazy 8’s and UNO. But this isn’t just a simple reskinning though. The numeral and item card distribution is unique to my design and there are many more types of item cards, or attacks, than in the original games.

I created this to be a fun family game, suitable for smaller children, but still with enough choice per turn to add more depth for older players. As a player starts to run out of cards, all competitors have opportunities to turn the tables on them leading to the same kind of frantic fun that Mario Kart is well-known for. In the description below you’ll find a link to the print and play files for this game.

First are the cards. Now, there’s a couple of popular ways to make a print and play card game. You can print the cards on paper and then insert them into what are commonly known as ‘penny sleeves’.

Then to make them sturdy, add any other type of worthless card you have lying around. My local dollar store had a two pack of poker cards that was perfect for this. I’ve also included a file of card backs you can use. This game is 108 cards so the sleeves make them pretty unwieldy to try to handle all at once.

After shuffling, I would split the deck and start the hand with a half deck, bringing in the second half when needed. Otherwise, you can print the cards directly on card stock instead. I used a local print shop to print these due to the cards not fitting within the printable margins of my home printer, and I chose self-service to avoid any copyright conflicts with the staff. They informed me that I could use my own paper in self-service, so next time I think I’ll try bringing 12 sheets of glossy cardstock. Either way, cutting out the cards is pretty tedious, so try using a paper cutter if you have access to one.

I’ve also included files for a printable tuck box. One sized for sleeved cards, and one sized for unsleeved cards. You can use the same method of box making that I showed in my last video to create this box.

And finally the game’s rules. This two-page document can be printed on two sheets, or front and back. If you fold them into thirds in both directions, these will reduce to a single card size for easy including with your cards.

All put together, this game makes for a truly unique addition to your game collection. Or maybe this can be a fun gift for just the right Mario fan on your list. It can even be a good ‘rainy day’ project for you and your children. But before I leave I wanted to show you this. This year I decided to gift myself a professionally printed copy of this game. Unfortunately, the margins weren’t set up properly, leaving the intended white borders cut off of the card faces, but some might prefer it this way.

This is still a very nicely made card deck. Instead of returning it, I’ve decided to give it away to one lucky viewer. You’ll find the details in the video description below.

Act fast, I’ll be drawing one winner on January 1st. Good Luck! My wish for you this holiday season and beyond is to simply have fun and spread good cheer.

I would love to know the games that have become family traditions for you. Thank you again for watching and if I’ve earned it, please consider subscribing and sharing my channel. If you wish to hear more about the design choices I made when I created this game, you can check out my follow up video by clicking this card.